Free Radio Linux Project by Radioqualia

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 — What Is It ? –

Free Radio LinuxA spectre is haunting the internet. The spectre of Open Source. Since Finnish programmer Linus Torvalds started development of the operating system, Linux in 1991, the collaborative model of software development has reached profound new heights. Consisting of millions of lines of source code (the Linux Kernel has 4,141,432 lines of code), Linux has been mutated, improved and sent spiraling off into new directions by literally thousands of programmers from all around the world. This is because Torvalds promoted a new, simple approach to the development of Linux: He made the code available on the internet for users of the operating system to read, view and alter. Sharing their ideas on the software and potential improvements was a core part of Torvalds’ ethic.

Due to the extraordinary success of Linux, the ethic of code sharing has reached new heights of popularity. Code sharing is no longer a process specific to computer science, rather it has become an ideology embraced by business, the computer using public, and a multitude of cultural, artistic and academic sectors. When Linux won one of electronic art’s most prestigious prizes, the Prix Ars Electronica for .net excellence in 1999, Open Source completed its journey from a prosaic functional process to a phenomenon verging on art.

– Background : Linux and Open Source

A spectre is haunting the internet. The spectre of Open Source. Since Finnish programmer Linus Torvalds started development of the operating system, Linux in 1991, the collaborative model of software development has reached profound new heights. Consisting of millions of lines of source code (the Linux Kernel has 4,141,432 lines of code), Linux has been mutated, improved and sent spiraling off into new directions by literally thousands of programmers from all around the world. This is because Torvalds promoted a new, simple approach to the development of Linux: He made the code available on the internet for users of the operating system to read, view and alter. Sharing their ideas on the software and potential improvements was a core part of Torvalds’ ethic.
Due to the extraordinary success of Linux, the ethic of code sharing has reached new heights of popularity. Code sharing is no longer a process specific to computer science, rather it has become an ideology embraced by business, the computer using public, and a multitude of cultural, artistic and academic sectors. When Linux won one of electronic art’s most prestigious prizes, the Prix Ars Electronica for .net excellence in 1999, Open Source completed its journey from a prosaic functional process to a phenomenon verging on art.

— Free Radio meets Free Software

In the hierarchy of media, radio reigns. There are more computers than modems, more phones than computers, and more radios than phones. Radio is the closest we have to an egalitarian method of information distribution. Free Radio Linux advocates that radio is the best method for distributing the world’s most popular free software.

Free Radio Linux will therefore be a networked broadcast system, transmitting on ether-net via open source audio codec, Ogg Vorbis and relayed on AM, Shortwave and FM frequencies, by a collection of ham radio amateurs and radio professionals.

Free Radio Linux also continues the tradition of FM ‘code stations’ of the early-mid eighties. These stations were pirate broadcasters who distributed bootleg software programmes via radio transmitters, allowing early hackers with home computers, such as Sinclair ZX80-81s, Commodore 64s, and Acorns, to demodulate the signal through a modem and run the code. The modern day equivalent, Free Radio Linux, similarly enables anyone with notepad to transcribe the code and utilize it at his or her convenience.

– Concept

Free Radio Linux intends to share the Linux Kernel with internet and radio listeners in way in which it is not normally experienced. Usually the code can be seen and read, but this project allows it to be heard in its entirety for the first time.

Like the net.art project History of Art for the Blind by artist Vuk Cosic, Free Radio Linux makes audible what is usually silent and hidden, and takes Linux into the previously unchartered sonic realm.

 

 

. / listen

The Free Radio Linux live stream is UP AGAIN, as of GMT 18:04 24/03/04. The server was down for a while but up again now…thanks for your patience.

Once restored, you can listen to the stream using an MP3 Player and the Ogg Vorbis codec installed. Please read the instructions below.

Windows
If you use windows you will need the Winamp player and the Ogg Vorbis plug-in.

Linux / UNIX
If you use Linux you will need XMMS and the Ogg Vorbis libraries available from the same site.

Mac
Mac OS X users can download the Jorbis Ogg Player. Those with ealier versions of the Mac OS unfortunately will have to wait for MacAmp to support Ogg Streaming.

As the files from the Linux kernel are read it is possible to either listen to the speech.bot or to view the current file being read.

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